Tag Archives: Bethesda

Review: DOOM

doom-cover
via Pinoy Tech Blog

DOOM (2016)

PC / Rated M

First-Person Shooter

Publisher: Bethesda, Zenimax Media

Developer: id Software, Certain Affinity, Escalation Studios


DOOM doesn’t waste any time before throwing you right into the action.  There’s a demonic invasion…and it’s your job to kill every single demon that falls in your path.  DOOM is a constant thrill ride from start to finish, turning the notch of intensity up with every level you play.  I’ve only played the game’s campaign, but that was all I needed out of this experience.  I just needed an excuse to kill a lot of demons…and DOOM delivered in every way.

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id Software has created a game with a hell of a lot of style.  (Pun certainly intended…yay for bad jokes!)  The game’s initial moments, which have you donning the iconic suit of the Doom Slayer, immediately set the mood and tone for the rest of the game.  As you make your way to an elevator, the main theme starts to play and we get the game’s title sequence.  Perhaps the best part of it all is the final beat of the song, which perfectly syncs up with your character cocking his gun, ready for the hell-bent mission awaiting him.  It’s the perfect introduction for the game, immediately putting you in the right mood.  It’s always important for a game to nail its initial moments, and DOOM’s first impression is outstanding and wild.

Understandably, the story tends to take the back seat for most of the game.  DOOM takes place on Mars where a UAC facility is being invaded by the evil and demonic forces of Hell.  You play a man who wakes up on an alter in the bowels of the UAC facility.  Upon freeing yourself from your chains, you quickly find your Praetor Suit, the suit that turns you into the Doom Slayer.  You then begin to realize that the facility’s demonic invasion has been enabled by Dr. Olivia Pierce, the game’s main antagonist.  With help from Dr. Samuel Hayden and the facilities’ VEGA system, your mission is to prepare yourself to stop Hell’s forces and end the demonic onslaught for good.  There’s nothing complex about the plot which mainly serves as an excuse for you to make your way through the Martian facility and eventually the pits of Hell.  It’s hard to knock the game because of its story since the game clearly knows what it is all about and why people are playing it.  You’re here to kill demons and DOOM clearly recognizes that, which is a good thing.

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via ONRPG

Besides the campaign’s objectives and waypoints, the other force that drives you through the game is the metal soundtrack that accompanies your every action.  Unlike most games where the soundtrack is mostly passive, DOOM’s soundtrack is an active soundtrack, one that really motivates you to kill the demons that step in your path.  The soundtrack, written and composed by Mick Gordon, is full of gritty and electronic metal.  It pairs with the game perfectly and does a great job at painting the game’s atmosphere.  There were many times where I was bobbing my head to the beat of the music while murdering hordes of demons onscreen.  It just felt right.  It made for some kick-ass moments.  It’s an example of a well-realized soundtrack that really jives with the game it’s accompanying.

When it comes to the actual act of demon slaying, this aspect of the game felt great as well.  The combat is extremely smooth and fast, which worked perfectly for this game’s style and feel.  The game runs nicely as well, which also enhanced the gameplay.  There’s a variety of guns that you unlock as you make your way through the game.  These guns all felt right and the upgrades that you acquire through skill points that you collect also make for more varied gunplay.  The shotgun and the heavy machine gun are your best friends, but weapons like the Gauss Cannon and the rocket launcher are a good way to go when battling tougher and beefier enemies.  I never felt like I was using the same weapon for too long.  I was constantly switching weapons to give myself the advantage when battling certain enemies, which is great from a game design standpoint.  There are also glory kills, which allow you to “finish off” enemies when they are low on health.  The advantage of performing a glory kill is that the enemy drops health when performed.  These kills were a novelty in the beginning, but they begin to grow old as you advance in the game.  The variety of these kills tapers off quickly and they become quite repetitive.  I never stopped performing these kills because of their benefits, but it’s a shame id Software didn’t do anything to change up the formula.

doom-3
via WCCF Tech

There’s no shortage of demons for you to kill in the game.  The game relentlessly throws demons your way left and right, which makes for a thrilling experience.  It’s non-stop action from start to finish with little bits of respite sprinkled throughout.  The enemy variety is great, starting you off with a couple of measly demons.  As you progress your way through the game, more enemy types are thrown into the mix, each with different strategies and move sets.  By the time the final level comes around, all the enemy types are joining forces to get a piece of you, making for some hectic late game firefights.  In addition, there are only a couple of boss fights in the game (three to be exact) which were a little underwhelming.  The three boss fights, including the final boss, were epic and grand in scale, and a lot of fun, but I would have liked to see a little more.  There were a good deal of open rooms with waves of demons coming your way.  It would have been nice if some of these rooms were actually boss fights, especially earlier on in the game.  This is only a minor complaint with the game however, as the action is still very relentless and a ton of fun.

I only played the campaign, so I can’t speak on the multiplayer modes or the Snapmap functionality, but the campaign alone is enough for me to recommend this game to anyone who hasn’t already taken the dive.  DOOM’s campaign is extremely polished and it has a ton of style which is established right from the get-go. The combat is great and only made better with the superb soundtrack that drives you through the experience.  At the end of the day, I came to DOOM because I wanted to kill endless scores of demons, and I can’t think of any other game that nails this experience better than DOOM.  Get ready to kill a lot of demons…Doom Slayer.

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Vault-Tec Needs You: Vault-Tec Workshop Impressions

Have you ever found yourself wandering through a vault in the Fallout universe and wondering what it would be like to build one of those vaults for yourself?  Have you wondered what it would be like to practice experiments on the vault dwellers within?  Now this dream is a reality in the Vault-Tec Workshop, the latest string of DLC add-ons for Bethesda’s Fallout 4.  It’s essentially a more fleshed out version of the studio’s mobile game Fallout Shelter, which is novel in concept. Vault-Tec Workshop doesn’t go without its faults though.

vault tec workshop 1
via WASD

The add-on starts you off with a quest calling you to investigate a mysterious cave, a new location added into the game.  Inside this cave you find what is seemingly an abandoned vault, although you hear a woman’s voice over the loudspeaker.  After defeating the enemies that are trying to break in through the vault door, you open the vault and come into contact with a new acquaintance, Valery Barstow, a ghoul who was meant to become the overseer of the uncompleted Vault 88, the vault in which you discovered.  After walking into the main area, you find a huge cave with loads of abandoned construction equipment and some feral ghouls who used to be a part of the crew.  After getting to know a little bit about Barstow and her ambitions for Vault 88, she sets you free with the task of finishing Vault 88 and the experiments that it was meant to run.  It might seem unethical at first, but that’s the question you will have to repeatedly struggle with as you continue to welcome in new settlers and complete different tasks for Barstow.  You can either murder Barstow in cold blood or complete her unethical, and sometimes devious, experiments on the settlers you welcome in.  It’s your choice, which is what I like about this add-on in particular.

The settlement space that the add-on gives you to build your vault is definitely the biggest space in the game by far.  You have a massive system of caves that you can explore and clear out to make room for your vault.  The game encourages players to reach level 20 before starting the DLC, because some of the enemies you will have to clear out are pretty tough.  Once you have explored and cleared the cave system, you have a massive cave at your disposal…which you pretty much can’t take advantage of due to the settlement size constraints.  You know that bar in the upper right corner in the workshop HUD that indicates “size”?  This size constraint unfortunately still applies to your vault, even though it gives you a massive space to work with.  If you’re on console (I have been playing on PS4) then you can pretty much forget creating a vault that spans the entire cave system.  If you want a vault that’s nice and furnished, then you’re pretty much going to have to stick to the main area for now, until mods come out that allow you to remove the size limitations.  It’s a pretty large oversight, but I understand that console limitations prevent you from creating vast vaults.  At the end of the day it’s a hardware constraint, but it’s still rather unfortunate, especially when your teased with such a massive building space to play around with.

vault tec workshop 2
via Video Games Zone

When you take into account all of Bethesda’s previous workshop add-ons for the game, Vault-Tec Workshop is probably the biggest and best addition to the constantly growing workshop feature set.  The add-on gives you a pretty hefty set of new workshop elements that give you the ability to create your very own Vault-Tec vault.  There’s a bunch of pre-sets that allow you to build hallways, atriums, dining spaces, living spaces, overseer offices and much more.  There’s also a host of new furniture options that relate specifically to what you typically find in vaults around the world.  Everything from Vault-Tec posters to diner benches have been included, allowing you to personalize your vault to your liking. Perhaps the most practical addition to the workshop is the Vault-Tec generators, that have the ability to produce 150 or 500 electricity.  These generators are powerhouses that will allow you to power up even the heftiest of vaults.  You can build all of these elements outside of the add-on’s underground area in any settlement of your choice, which can potentially lead to some unique creations as well.

For all you diabolical folks who want to conduct experiments on your vault’s dwellers, you get a pretty nice array of experiments to choose from.  In all, there are four objects that allow you to conduct three experiments each, which totals up to twelve experiments in all.  These objects range from elliptical bikes to soda machines to slot machines.  These experiments are not as crazy as some of the others that you have seen in other vaults, but they are enough to suffice.  You also can’t create your own, so your stuck with what the add-on gives you.  There’s a population management terminal that allows you to manage all of your vault dwellers, which provides a nice and easy way to get a glance at what everyone is doing.  You can also equip your dwellers with their very own Vault 88 jumpsuits and Pip-Boys, which is a nice touch in itself.  The add-on goes pretty far in letting you create what feels like an authentic vault.

vault tec workshop 3
via Film Games Etc

Despite the size limitations that inhibit you from creating expansive vault systems, the Vault-Tec Workshop is a nice addition to Fallout 4.  Sure, in the end it’s just a console version of Fallout Shelter, but the add-on provides enough items and features to make it worth taking a look at.  At the end of the day, I would have preferred a little more story add-ons like the previous Fallout games, but these workshop add-ons will suffice for now.  Nuka World, presumably Fallout 4’s final piece of DLC, is coming out next month, but Vault-Tec Workshop should be enough to hold over fans in the meantime.

Fallout 4: Far Harbor Impressions

Because of the nature of the article, spoilers might be littered throughout.  If you haven’t gone through the DLC already, proceed with caution.

Here it is, the Fallout 4 add-on we have all been waiting for is finally here.  The two previous pieces of extra content, Automatron and Wasteland Workshop largely centered around the main game’s workshop component.  While this necessarily isn’t a bad thing, their certainly a far cry from Bethesda’s normal post-launch content rollouts.  The two pieces of DLC had some cool stuff, but they pale in size to Bethesda’s normal expansion content.  The latest piece of DLC, Far Harbor, is the first piece of major story DLC that adds a substantial questline, Bethesda’s largest landmass for a DLC, new characters, and new enemies.  Like I said before, this is the DLC that most fans have been anticipating since it was first announced, alongside Automatron and Wasteland Workshop.  Now that it’s out, I have spent some quality time with the new content and I have some thoughts…some positive and some negative.

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via Find My Soft

Your adventure begins when a new case gets sent into the Valentine Detective Agency.  It involves a young woman who has run away from home, leaving her parents in distress.  It’s up to you and Nick Valentine (a companion I highly recommend bringing along with you for the adventure) to get to the bottom of her disappearance and the reasoning behind her wanting to leave home.  Upon arriving at her coastal home, clues lead to her whereabouts in Far Harbor, a deadly island in Maine that’s enveloped with the Fog, a radioactive nightmare.  This thus kicks off your boat ride to Far Harbor, where you discover a deeper conflict, much bigger than the case of Kasumi Nakano, the girl you are tasked with finding.

There’s three main factions that call Far Harbor their home, the harbor men and woman of Far Harbor, the synth colony of Acadia, and the Children of Atom.  Upon setting foot on the island, it doesn’t take long to grasp the amount of tension brewing between the three groups.  There all at a standoff, and it’s up to you to bring peace or to cause chaos.  There’s a variety of different endings that result from your actions.  If you play your cards right, you can leave far harbor with all three factions living in a sort of harmony.  You can also leave with all three factions destroyed.  Let’s just say that it’s insanely easy to mess things up if you’re not careful…which is where I found myself upon Far Harbor’s ending.

far harbor 2
via Attack of the Fanboy

When you give a visit to Acadia, you meet the synth named DiMA, the weird-looking synth that you probably saw from the trailer.  He seems like a nice, peaceful synth who doesn’t want to cause trouble, but you soon learn that there’s a darker secret he’s keeping from you.  Upon unearthing some of his dirty deeds, I demanded that he travel to Far Harbor and fess up to his deeds.  During my play-through of Fallout 4, I was a big advocate for the truth.  I didn’t like to lie if I didn’t have to.  I thought having DiMA be honest with the citizens of Far Harbor would be the right thing to do.  Unfortunately, this is where I was sadly mistaken.  The harbor men carried out the justice that needed to be done for DiMA’s doings, but despite my pleadings, they also found Acadia, and all the innocent Synths (including Kasumi) within, guilty as well.  Before I knew it, DiMA and Acadia were brutally murdered and wiped from existence…all because I thought the truth was the way to go.  One of the island’s main factions was destroyed, and I was only two hours into the DLC.  What have I done?

This bothered me.  After kissing up to the different factions, I made the decision that I wanted Far Harbor and Acadia to survive to the end, while the Children of Atom could be destroyed.  I understood that there were some innocent souls in the Children of Atom, but they seemed like the bad guys with the bad intentions of wiping everyone off the island.  In my eyes, they had to go.  But here I was, two hours in, and Acadia was killed right before my eyes.  I then had to carry out my mission of destroying the Children of Atom, which left the citizens of Far Harbor the sole survivors on the island.  This isn’t necessarily a “bad ending,” but it felt pretty depressing.  Especially since when all was said and done, I had to travel back to the Commonwealth and break the news to Kasumi’s parents that their daughter was brutally murdered in cold blood because of one synth’s actions.  At least that’s what I told them.  How was I supposed to tell them that it was my actions that killed their daughter?  In my pursuit of honesty and truth for Far Harbor, I ended up telling a lie in the end.  It’s this kind of irony that sucks…  In the words of Nick Valentine, “case closed.”  It wasn’t the way I wanted things to turn out, but the truth was indeed found and Kasumi was brought home…in a body bag, unfortunately.  Just another cruel day in the wasteland.

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via 4Players

As a result of my choices, Far Harbor was sort of a bummer for me.  There’s nothing wrong with the story, in fact, Bethesda did a fantastic job with the story.  There’s a lot of great and interesting ways in which you can resolve the island’s issues…it’s just unfortunate that my way, which in my eyes was the right way, turned bad…pretty quickly.  Sure, I could load up an old save and replay the events to work more in my favor…but that’s just not my style.  I live with the decisions that I make and move on…it’s what makes these games so great.

Despite the story’s strength’s I did have some issues with some of the smaller aspects of the story.  For instance, DiMA’s monologue about synths and their identity didn’t really hit home like it probably should have.  At one point she even poses the question, “are you a synth?”  It made me step back and think…but then I realized the holes in DiMA’s thinking.  The player was clearly alive before the bombs fell, a time in which synths weren’t even in the picture.  You then black out in cryo-sleep in the vault, waking up years later, but c’mon, does the game really expect me to believe that in that time the player was switched out with the body of a synth?  I don’t think so.  Don’t get me wrong, it’s an inherently interesting idea, but it’s also half-baked, especially considering the fact that it was never once mentioned again for the rest of the story.  A thought cast into the wind.  There’s also issue with the game’s ending.  After destroying the Children of Atom by setting off a nuclear bomb in their facility, the DLC was essentially brought to a close.  I “cleansed the land.”  After traveling back to Far Harbor, where I expected to get greeted with fanfare, I was instead met with silence and…well, nothing.  Everybody was carrying out their own business, with not a care in the world to talk to me.

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via PS4 Daily

Umm…guys, did no one notice the gigantic nuclear explosion to the west?  No?  What about the whole, “Let’s destroy the Children of Atom!” thing?  Yeah…I did that!  I took them out, just like you wanted.  Does no one care?  Hello?  Oh god…someone talk to me so I don’t go crazy…

Okay, maybe it was a bug or an issue with the game, but it still dampened the experience.  I was expecting the bow to be tied on the story…but instead I was left to my own devices.  There was no closure.  Just a “quest completed” notification.  I didn’t let this get to me too much, but I couldn’t help but feel a little disappointed…even if it was just a bug.  I also understand that I might be in the small minority that was bothered by this.  That doesn’t make it right though.

But enough of this negativity, huh?  Let’s talk about where this add-on really shines and that is with its locales and its enemies.  The island of Far Harbor is by far the biggest landmass Bethesda has ever created for a DLC.  To give you an idea of how big it is, I’d say it is probably around a fourth of the size of the Commonwealth.  The environment hearkens back to another piece of Fallout DLC, which was Point Lookout.  There’s a lot of coastal locations mixed with swampy bogs as you make your way towards the mainland.  Although some areas seem to be recycled from some of the main game’s locations, like the bowling alley, there is still a good bit of variety in the island’s landmarks.  Probably one of the coolest places for players to explore is Vault 118, a full-size vault hidden away under a cliffside resort.  It marks the first time Bethesda has put a full-scale vault inside one of its expansions.  It’s also home to a quest which might be one of the best parts of Far Harbor.

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via Imgur

Then there’s the creatures that roam the island.  Far Harbor is no walk in the park.  It’s a hostile place with a bunch of new monsters that want to have you for dinner.  Some of the new enemy types are rehashed versions of Mirelurks and Ghouls, while others are completely new, including Anglers and Gulpers.  There’s also some larger enemies that will mess your day up if you’re not careful.  There’s a hermit crab that uses the back of a bus as its shell.  It’s as terrifying as it sounds and it made for a pretty lengthy encounter.  That’s just a sampling of some of the enemies that you will encounter during your travels.  Want to know a pro-tip?  Maybe pack some Radaway before you leave for the island, because you will surely need it.

Far Harbor left me conflicted in the end, but I still can’t deny that I had a lot of fun with Bethesda’s first major expansion pack for Fallout 4.  The story is engaging and the characters that you will meet along the way are just as great.  You will even get a new companion, who’s old but still a bad-ass.  There’s plenty of places to explore and things to do, with around ten to twelve hours of content to tackle.  It’s without a question that this is the best piece of DLC that the game has to offer right now and it makes me excited for what’s to come in the next three add-ons.  Just promise me Bethesda that you leave the workshop expansions at home…please.  We need three more add-ons like Far Harbor.

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via Find My Soft

Fallout 4 Wasteland Workshop: Cool in Concept, Bummer in Reality

The notion of a perfectly tamed Deathclaw roaming around your settlement in Fallout 4 is rousing and perhaps a little concerning.  Why would you want Deathclaws and other ferocious beats of the wasteland making themselves at home in your settlement?  Well, there’s no reason at all.  You can have them fight your settlers and each other though!  This is the driving force behind Bethesda’s latest add-on for their acclaimed RPG Fallout 4.  The expansion, titled Wasteland Workshop, offers some new stuff for your settlements and the ability to house a battle arena…but that’s about it.

wasteland workshop 1
via VG247

Maybe the biggest draw this time around is the prospect of essentially starting up your own wasteland petting zoo.  The expansion adds a variety of cages into the workshop mode, the aspect of the game that allows you to customize and build your own settlements.  These cages range from small to large, depending on the type of creature you want to capture.  You can capture a good majority of the monsters that Fallout 4 has to offer, including Deathclaws, Yao Guais, Mutant Hounds, Brahmin, and more.  You can also house sentient beings like Raiders, Gunners, and Ghouls.  There’s even cats, although putting a cat cage in the same arena as a Deathclaw doesn’t bode well.  Trust me, I learn from experience.

When you initially capture these creatures, they’re hostile depending on their type.  This is where the Beta Wave Emitter comes in, a new workshop item that pacifies any and all creatures within its reach.  This is the item that allows deadly creatures like Deathclaws to roam around your settlement without the urge to rip your lungs out.  Unfortunately, you have to have certain perks like Wasteland Whisperer and Animal Friend to build this item, which is pretty much necessary if you want to have these creatures in your settlement.  I often found my creatures out of their cages either because of generator failure or you know, just because.  It happened enough that my settlement started to become a littered mess of monster corpses.  I would kill them, reset the bait, and then repeat.  It started to become tedious.  Having creatures locked up in your settlement is also a good way to bring unwanted attention to your settlement.  You’ll find your settlement getting attacked a lot more when you have creatures in the cages.  It was almost comical how much times I started to get attacked as I built more and more cages.  It started to get real annoying after a while and I later just abandoned the settlement…it started to become too much.

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via VG247

Another big feature that Wasteland Workshop brings to the table is arena fights.  These fights can involve your settlement’s inhabitants or your creatures…or both.  New workshop items let you build your own battle arena in your settlements, which sounded pretty exciting at first.  Unfortunately, the battles are a little cumbersome to set up and they’re not that exciting to watch either.  There’s a little value to be found in the first couple of fights…but it started to become too much work to be enjoyable.  Your settlement’s moral goes down as well if settlers are killing each other so there is really no point in having your settlers duke it out, unless you’re a maniacal psychopath that loves to watch the world burn.  If that fits your bill, then this DLC might just be up your wheelhouse.  This add-on does a lot more to destroy your settlements then build them up.

Perhaps the best part about the add-on, and maybe the smallest new feature, is the addition of customizable neon signs that you can adorn on your settlement’s structures.  The workshop gives you the full alphabet, allowing you to basically light up whatever word or phrase that you want.  It’s only cosmetic, but there’s a lot of value.  I was littering my settlements with neon signs in no time.  You can make some pretty silly stuff with these neon signs, which is half the fun.

wasteland workshop 3
via Just Push Start

Unlike past Bethesda expansions, Wasteland Workshop is a barren wasteland in terms of content…or at least content that matters.  The monster cages and arena fights sound really cool on paper but the actual reality of these ideas doesn’t translate the same amount of excitement.  Besides the neon signs, there really isn’t that much else.  I was hoping that we would get a lot more workshop items but instead we only got a select few.  If you’re an owner of a season pass, like me, then none of this really matters anyway.  No harm no foul.  However, if you decided to play it safe by picking and choosing what add-ons you wanted to purchase, then there is really no reason you should pick this one up.  Just wait for their next expansion, Far Harbor.

Fallout 4 Automatron: Robots, Robots, and More Robots

fallout 4 automatron coverFallout 4 might have been released last November, but the game is far from being drained out.  New content is on the way, starting with the latest piece of DLC for Bethesda’s post-apocalyptic RPG, Automatron.  The add-on is small when you compare it to the DLC that was released for Fallout 3 and Fallout New Vegas, but there is a substantial bit of content that adds some pretty cool features to the base game.

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via 3D Juegos

Robots get the spotlight in Automatron.  The DLC is all about robots.  During the add-on’s first moments, you stumble upon a fight in progress between a caravan of wasteland survivors and a band of rogue robots.  You lend your fighting skills to the battle, but ultimately can’t do anything to save the caravan.  You defeat the robots, but the only survivor from the battle is a robot companion named Ada.  She informs you that the rogue robots are a product of the mysterious figure known as the Mechanist.  The Mechanist has been developing a high number of heavily armed robots and setting them free across the Commonwealth to help the people they come across.  Misinterpretation can be deadly however, as the robots take it upon themselves to “kill” the people of the Commonwealth, instead of “help.”

With your newfound robot companion Ada at your side, it becomes your mission to investigate who this mysterious Mechanist is and why he is doing what he is doing.  The new DLC contains a short little quest line, consisting of four new missions.  The quest line is short, requiring only about two-three hours of your time.  The story is short, but sweet and tells an interesting story that wraps up pretty nicely.  It’s nothing mind-blowing, but it will keep you entertained.  It will give you a chance to revisit some existing locations as well as some new areas, including a new RobCo facility full of deadly robots that want your blood.

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via PS4 France

The quests and storyline that that DLC provides are nice, but let’s get into the aspect that everybody comes for; the robot building.  Yep, the DLC gives you the ability to modify Ada or construct your own robot.  As you make your way through the DLC, you will pick up various robot parts that you can use to customize your own robot.  You can modify things like armor, weapons, special abilities, and the paint job of your robot.  There’s a lot of customization tools at your disposal, giving players the ability to make some intense looking robots.  The customization and modding pretty much works just like the base games’ weapon and armor customization, so familiar players should feel right at home.  There’s not too much you can do in terms of paint jobs, which is a little unfortunate.  Players have the ability to give their Power Armor some pretty neat paint jobs, so I was hoping it was going to be the same for the robots.  Base colors make up the only paint jobs you can give your robot…which is a small bummer.

During my play-through I only modified Ada, so I can’t speak too much for what it’s like to create your own robots.  However, it was a lot of fun and had enough tools to let you be creative in the type of robot you want to make.  You can develop Sentry Bots, Mr. Handy Robots, Assaultrons, and other robots similar to what you can find in the world.  Speaking of robot enemies, there’s a plethora of new robot enemies that you’ll encounter in Automatron.  They range from simple junk bots to massive, and slightly terrifying, Sentry Bots with skulls for faces. These new robots will prove tough to fight and there were a number of battles were getting overwhelmed was pretty easy.  The game sets the level requirement to 15, which makes sense.  Any level one player will get mowed down in seconds.  The robots aren’t too tough, but they will put up a fight unlike some of the other enemies from the base game.

fallout 4 automatron 3
via Softpedia

A mark of a good DLC is if it enriches existing content in addition to providing something new.  New stuff is always nice, but if the DLC doesn’t give you a reason to go back to the base game, then what’s the point of making it an add-on?  Automatron gives players a whole new set of customization tools that give the incentive for you to go back through the wasteland to collect materials for your new robots.  I was a little lukewarm at first when the first two Fallout 4 add-ons were small little experiences, but Automatron proved its worth pretty quickly.  The pack’s price, $9.99 (the price if you didn’t pick up the Season Pass), is worth it if you are hesitant on picking up the, now more expensive, Season Pass.